Election officials are urging Californians to have a plan when heading to the polls on Election Day.Polling places will be enforcing social distancing practices and some locations may have lines, according to officials in Sacramento County.KCRA 3’s Emily Maher spoke with Sacramento County spokesperson Janna Haynes about the best things to do to when casting your ballot.1) Try voting during “off-hours”Haynes suggested in-person voters go to polling places during the mid-morning or mid-afternoon.“Don’t wait until 7 p.m. and expect that you’re going to get right in and right out,” Haynes said.2) Call the election hotline for information about wait timesFor the first time, Sacramento County voters can call the hotline to find out how long the wait to vote is at the county’s 84 vote centers.“We are adding this feature because we want to limit the number of people at any given place,” Haynes said. “If we can spread anybody out, that works to all of our benefit.”The election hotline phone number is 916-875-6451.3) Fill out your sample ballot ahead of timeVoters received a sample ballot in the mail with their voter guide.Haynes said while there’s no limit on the amount of time a voter can spend in the ballot box, she urged people to consider coming prepared.“You can fill out your ballot as quickly as possible, as long as you’re taking the time to get the right vote down,” she said. 4) There could be linesHaynes said Election Day voters should be prepared for the possibility of lines at vote centers due in part to COVID-19 precautions.“Because of maximum capacity limits, potential lines, large crowds tomorrow, we really encourage people to be prepared and to come with your patience because you may experience long lines not only due to crowds, but because of maximum capacities in our vote centers that will require fewer people to be inside,” she said.Vote centers close at 8 p.m. People are allowed to vote after a vote center closes as long as they are in line before closing time.5) Extra resources are available for voters who need themThe county has additional resources available for voters who need language assistance.Haynes said ballots are available in a dozen languages.“We also try to staff vote centers with bilingual workers in areas where we know we have a concentration of residents that maybe they do speak English, but feel more comfortable reading and making decisions for something as important as their ballot in their native language,” Haynes said.Voters can also call the election hotline to be connected to a polling place that has staff that speak the native language requested.A translator can also be brought with them.All county vote centers are compliant under the Americans with Disabilities Act Standards.Vote centers also have touchscreens for voters who need them.“These are ballot-specific,” Haynes said. “They read a card that has your precinct’s ballot on it. It allows you to vote that ballot either through touching the touchscreen, that’s a much larger print for people that have visual impairments or if they have a physical disability that makes it difficult to hold a pencil, for instance.”

Election officials are urging Californians to have a plan when heading to the polls on Election Day.

Polling places will be enforcing social distancing practices and some locations may have lines, according to officials in Sacramento County.

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KCRA 3’s Emily Maher spoke with Sacramento County spokesperson Janna Haynes about the best things to do to when casting your ballot.

1) Try voting during “off-hours”

Haynes suggested in-person voters go to polling places during the mid-morning or mid-afternoon.

“Don’t wait until 7 p.m. and expect that you’re going to get right in and right out,” Haynes said.

2) Call the election hotline for information about wait times

For the first time, Sacramento County voters can call the hotline to find out how long the wait to vote is at the county’s 84 vote centers.

“We are adding this feature because we want to limit the number of people at any given place,” Haynes said. “If we can spread anybody out, that works to all of our benefit.”

The election hotline phone number is 916-875-6451.

3) Fill out your sample ballot ahead of time

Voters received a sample ballot in the mail with their voter guide.

Haynes said while there’s no limit on the amount of time a voter can spend in the ballot box, she urged people to consider coming prepared.

“You can fill out your ballot as quickly as possible, as long as you’re taking the time to get the right vote down,” she said.

4) There could be lines

Haynes said Election Day voters should be prepared for the possibility of lines at vote centers due in part to COVID-19 precautions.

“Because of maximum capacity limits, potential lines, large crowds tomorrow, we really encourage people to be prepared and to come with your patience because you may experience long lines not only due to crowds, but because of maximum capacities in our vote centers that will require fewer people to be inside,” she said.

Vote centers close at 8 p.m. People are allowed to vote after a vote center closes as long as they are in line before closing time.

5) Extra resources are available for voters who need them

The county has additional resources available for voters who need language assistance.

Haynes said ballots are available in a dozen languages.

“We also try to staff vote centers with bilingual workers in areas where we know we have a concentration of residents that maybe they do speak English, but feel more comfortable reading and making decisions for something as important as their ballot in their native language,” Haynes said.

Voters can also call the election hotline to be connected to a polling place that has staff that speak the native language requested.

A translator can also be brought with them.

All county vote centers are compliant under the Americans with Disabilities Act Standards.

Vote centers also have touchscreens for voters who need them.

“These are ballot-specific,” Haynes said. “They read a card that has your precinct’s ballot on it. It allows you to vote that ballot either through touching the touchscreen, that’s a much larger print for people that have visual impairments or if they have a physical disability that makes it difficult to hold a pencil, for instance.”

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