A 3-year-old boy is safe thanks to the quick thinking of a man at a pool.Garrett Sheppard said he spent Sunday at a swimming pool in his metro apartment complex when the child began to drown.“There was screaming and yelling,” Sheppard said. “I turned my head and one of the adults had the kid and was pulling him out of the water.”Sheppard said he made his way across the pool, climbed out of the water and started CPR.“I have never seen so much water come out of a person,” he said. “It was actually really, really scary.”Janna Day, with UnityPoint Health, said young children should wear life jackets at pools and be no longer than an arm’s length away from the parent or caregiver.According to Day, tragedy can strike in a split second and is often hard to recognize.“Everybody thinks drowning is loud and there is a lot of splashing, and you think it is what you see in the movies,” Day said. “It is not. Drowning is actually quiet.”Sheppard said the child’s family thanked him and said, “I never thought someone like you would help someone like me.”Sheppard is white and the child he helped save is Black. He said color would never stop him from doing what he can to help.“Don’t believe in that,” Sheppard said. “We are all Americans. We are all here together. There has to be a lot of love.”The boy’s family told KCCI Wednesday that the 3-year-old spent Sunday night in the hospital but is doing fine.Sheppard said he was only 5 years old and unable to help his sister when she drowned at a pool years ago.He was happy he was there Sunday and trained in CPR by the Des Moines YMCA.

A 3-year-old boy is safe thanks to the quick thinking of a man at a pool.

Garrett Sheppard said he spent Sunday at a swimming pool in his metro apartment complex when the child began to drown.

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“There was screaming and yelling,” Sheppard said. “I turned my head and one of the adults had the kid and was pulling him out of the water.”

Sheppard said he made his way across the pool, climbed out of the water and started CPR.

“I have never seen so much water come out of a person,” he said. “It was actually really, really scary.”

Janna Day, with UnityPoint Health, said young children should wear life jackets at pools and be no longer than an arm’s length away from the parent or caregiver.

According to Day, tragedy can strike in a split second and is often hard to recognize.

“Everybody thinks drowning is loud and there is a lot of splashing, and you think it is what you see in the movies,” Day said. “It is not. Drowning is actually quiet.”

Sheppard said the child’s family thanked him and said, “I never thought someone like you would help someone like me.”

Sheppard is white and the child he helped save is Black. He said color would never stop him from doing what he can to help.

“Don’t believe in that,” Sheppard said. “We are all Americans. We are all here together. There has to be a lot of love.”

The boy’s family told KCCI Wednesday that the 3-year-old spent Sunday night in the hospital but is doing fine.

Sheppard said he was only 5 years old and unable to help his sister when she drowned at a pool years ago.

He was happy he was there Sunday and trained in CPR by the Des Moines YMCA.

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